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Banda Vol2

Mexican/Spanish Music Videos, Vol. 2 by Micki Wendt

It has come to my attention that there are many northern visitors here who don't have Mexican cable TV, and therefore, probably have never seen Mexican music videos.  How sad! Mexican music is cheerful and vibrant, some is riotously up-tempo, and the bandas are comprised of guys who can sing, dance, play an instrument, and smile, all at the same time. Works for me!  Some of them even appear to have day jobs as charros - that is, cowboys.  

The cable video channel which emanates from Guadalajara features mostly banda, which is a style derived from German and other European immigrants who came to Mexico in the 19th century, and brought with them the musical instruments of their homeland - accordions, trumpets, trombones, tubas, and clarinets - as well as their popular musical style - polka.  (Various string instruments had already been brought over by the Spanish, and their use evolved into Mariachi.)  As the local people learned to play and master these instruments, bandas were formed in many villages to provide Sunday afternoon entertainment in their plazas.  Increasing in popularity, and encouraged by the revolutionary leaders, bandas became part of most of the fiestas and government holiday parades, evoking a somewhat European/North American military band style.

Coincidentally with the North American Big Band era of the 30’s and 40s, banda music gradually evolved into a more commercially viable style.  Utilizing the innovations of sound technology, vocalists were added, and this style has grown to be very popular around this area and among many Mexicans in general.

Most banda music is extremely up-tempo - you will certainly see the relation to polka music, but it is played with that very special, dynamic Mexican…zing.  Bandas also play songs with other rhythms and styles, such as the hypnotic Cumbia beat, which comes from Colombia, ranchera, and norteno, as well as exquisitely romantic ballads.  A few songs reveal a North American pop influence.

The dominant mood of most music here is that quintessentially Mexican alegria - that is, cheerfulness.  You’ll hear it in the air all over Mexico, an important element of the sound track here, along with the happy kids and songbirds, as well as guys singing along with the jukeboxes in the cantinas, as they have a few after a hard day's work.

Another couple of cable channels feature international "pop" music in Spanish, which falls from being very Latin to very Euro-Northern pop.  The only glimpse I had previously had of these styles was when I happened to come across the impressive Latin Grammy show some time ago, which rocked the audience with lots of warmth and intense rhythm.

Not everyone is aware that the native Spanish-speaking world is as big as the native English-speaking world, and the Spanish music world is equally important.  (I don't like to call it "Latin" music. I took Latin in high school, and, trust me, they are not singing in Latin!)  By watching these Mexican channels, I've discovered a whole new world of music which I would like to share with you.  I hope you enjoy the following professional and official artist videos.

Some of the following artists also perform at various fiestas in this area.  Now, when you see those banda event posters around town, you might know who they are talking about.

If you missed Volume 1, please see the archives at the end of this article. 


Kicking off our second set is German Lizarraga and the Stars of Sinaloa.  Shot in Matzatlan, this video has scenes of the huge Carnaval parade there.  Here is Jambalaya like you've never heard it before.  Huya, Huya!

 

If you have ever heard any town banda, you have probably heard this song, Cumbia Del Rio by Banda Original del Sol, featuring the clarinet riff that rocked Mexico.  This video features a banda free-for-all down by the river:

 

Next, we have another fiesta staple by another band of the Lizarraga clan, the godfathers of banda, performing El Mechon in this very rollicking and up tempo video. A "mechon" is a hair streak, which can refer to either grey or frosted.  According to my former young gardener, the lyrics are saying something like "my my hair streak, turn me on, hair streak...etc.)  Here is the Banda Sinaloense de Sergio Lizarraga:

 

Shakira, La Colombiana, she of the truthful hips, teamed up with the Spanish Alejandro Sanz, burning up TV sets all over the world with their incendiary song/video La Tortura several years ago.  But, in this song/video Te Lo Agradezco, Pero No, (I Appreciate It, But No) they turn the heat down to an intense smolder with a very romantic and elegant vocal duet and dance:

 

Ingrata (Ingrate) Behind the Cameras offers us an intentionally amateurish video, complete with boom mikes showing, in this fun video featuring a not-so-traditional serenade of the singer's love interest, which is still a Mexican tradition.  Notice how much fun the banda is having!  Bringing his trademark wild and crazy energy to a very traditional style is  Bruno de Jesus and La Energia:

 

Before La Maria, Julion Alvarez had another huge hit entitled Las Mulas de Moreno (The Mules of Moreno).  This slightly bawdy song/video reveals the secret world of Mexican cowboys out on the range.  Fair Warning - there is a word blipped out!  Viewer Discretion Advised!

 

Mexican/Spanish Music Videos, Vol. 2 by Micki Wendt

It has come to my attention that there are many northern visitors here who don't have Mexican cable TV, and therefore, probably have never seen Mexican music videos.  How sad! Mexican music is cheerful and vibrant, some is riotously up-tempo, and the bandas are comprised of guys who can sing, dance, play an instrument, and smile, all at the same time. Works for me!  Some of them even appear to have day jobs as charros - that is, cowboys.  

The cable video channel which emanates from Guadalajara features mostly banda, which is a style derived from German and other European immigrants who came to Mexico in the 19th century, and brought with them the musical instruments of their homeland - accordions, trumpets, trombones, tubas, and clarinets - as well as their popular musical style - polka.  (Various string instruments had already been brought over by the Spanish, and their use evolved into Mariachi.)  As the local people learned to play and master these instruments, bandas were formed in many villages to provide Sunday afternoon entertainment in their plazas.  Increasing in popularity, and encouraged by the revolutionary leaders, bandas became part of most of the fiestas and government holiday parades, evoking a somewhat European/North American military band style.

Coincidentally with the North American Big Band era of the 30’s and 40s, banda music gradually evolved into a more commercially viable style.  Utilizing the innovations of sound technology, vocalists were added, and this style has grown to be very popular around this area and among many Mexicans in general.

Most banda music is extremely up-tempo - you will certainly see the relation to polka music, but it is played with that very special, dynamic Mexican…zing.  Bandas also play songs with other rhythms and styles, such as the hypnotic Cumbia beat, which comes from Colombia, ranchera, and norteno, as well as exquisitely romantic ballads.  A few songs reveal a North American pop influence.

The dominant mood of most music here is that quintessentially Mexican alegria - that is, cheerfulness.  You’ll hear it in the air all over Mexico, an important element of the sound track here, along with the happy kids and songbirds, as well as guys singing along with the jukeboxes in the cantinas, as they have a few after a hard day's work.

Another couple of cable channels feature international "pop" music in Spanish, which falls from being very Latin to very Euro-Northern pop.  The only glimpse I had previously had of these styles was when I happened to come across the impressive Latin Grammy show some time ago, which rocked the audience with lots of warmth and intense rhythm.

Not everyone is aware that the native Spanish-speaking world is as big as the native English-speaking world, and the Spanish music world is equally important.  (I don't like to call it "Latin" music. I took Latin in high school, and, trust me, they are not singing in Latin!)  By watching these Mexican channels, I've discovered a whole new world of music which I would like to share with you.  I hope you enjoy the following professional and official artist videos.

Some of the following artists also perform at various fiestas in this area.  Now, when you see those banda event posters around town, you might know who they are talking about.

If you missed Volume 1, please see the archives at the end of this article. 


Kicking off our second set is German Lizarraga and the Stars of Sinaloa.  Shot in Matzatlan, this video has scenes of the huge Carnaval parade there.  Here is Jambalaya like you've never heard it before.  Huya, Huya!

 

If you have ever heard any town banda, you have probably heard this song, Cumbia Del Rio by Banda Original del Sol, featuring the clarinet riff that rocked Mexico.  This video features a banda free-for-all down by the river:

 

Next, we have another fiesta staple by another band of the Lizarraga clan, the godfathers of banda, performing El Mechon in this very rollicking and up tempo video. A "mechon" is a hair streak, which can refer to either grey or frosted.  According to my former young gardener, the lyrics are saying something like "my my hair streak, turn me on, hair streak...etc.)  Here is the Banda Sinaloense de Sergio Lizarraga:

 

Shakira, La Colombiana, she of the truthful hips, teamed up with the Spanish Alejandro Sanz, burning up TV sets all over the world with their incendiary song/video La Tortura several years ago.  But, in this song/video Te Lo Agradezco, Pero No, (I Appreciate It, But No) they turn the heat down to an intense smolder with a very romantic and elegant vocal duet and dance:

 

Ingrata (Ingrate) Behind the Cameras offers us an intentionally amateurish video, complete with boom mikes showing, in this fun video featuring a not-so-traditional serenade of the singer's love interest, which is still a Mexican tradition.  Notice how much fun the banda is having!  Bringing his trademark wild and crazy energy to a very traditional style is  Bruno de Jesus and La Energia:

 

Before La Maria, Julion Alvarez had another huge hit entitled Las Mulas de Moreno (The Mules of Moreno).  This slightly bawdy song/video reveals the secret world of Mexican cowboys out on the range.  Fair Warning - there is a word blipped out!  Viewer Discretion Advised!

 

Jenny Rivera is one of the few female banda superstars.  In this lovely song/video, she teams up with Tito El Bambino in a deeply felt  and inspiring story of...Love...the larger, universal kind.

 

Luis Miguel earned his first Grammy at the age of 15, about 25 years ago, and has gone on to become the top-selling recording artist in the Spanish-speaking world, and no wonder!  Here is the golden-voiced Miguel in a supremely passionate, romantic ballad called Si Tu Te Atreves (If You Dare).

Memo to L.M:  I dare...I dare!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kSmFVhq2ww&feature=channel

Please see archives for Volume One by clicking here.

Archives for Volume Two by clicking here.

Archives for Volume Three by clicking here.

  I hope you have enjoyed these videos as much as I do.

Jenny Rivera is one of the few female banda superstars.  In this lovely song/video, she teams up with Tito El Bambino in a deeply felt  and inspiring story of...Love...the larger, universal kind.

 

Luis Miguel earned his first Grammy at the age of 15, about 25 years ago, and has gone on to become the top-selling recording artist in the Spanish-speaking world, and no wonder!  Here is the golden-voiced Miguel in a supremely passionate, romantic ballad called Si Tu Te Atreves (If You Dare).

Memo to L.M:  I dare...I dare!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kSmFVhq2ww&feature=channel

Please see archives for Volume One by clicking here.

Archives for Volume Two by clicking here.

Archives for Volume Three by clicking here.

  I hope you have enjoyed these videos as much as I do.




Copyright 2018, AjijicNews.com