Please Visit our Ajijic News Advertisers
Pets Needing Homes | Home Ajijic News | Contact Us | Business Directory | Calendar | Ajijic Photo Gallery | Refer a Friend | Weather | Sign Up For Our Newsletter | Submit News | Login | Register
 
Navigation
:: 2014 September Fiesta
:: Ajijic Jan-Easter Fiestas 2014
:: Ajijic October Fiestas 2014
:: Ajijic Summer Fiestas 2014
:: Nov-Dec Ajijic Fiestas 2012
:: Ajijic News Site Map

Ajijic Menu


   
Bandas Vol 4

Click to Share on Facebook

NEW! NEW!!  Mexican/Spanish Music Videos, Vol. 4 by Micki Wendt

Selena Quintanilla was a young Mexican-American from Texas who was tragically gunned down in 1995 thereby making her a Legend In Her Own Time.  Just on the brink of major stardom both in the US and Mexico, she had started out with her childhood family band which later added flamboyant guitarist, Chris Perez, whom she later married.  Here is the beautiful and talented Selena singing a delightfully catchy dance ditty called "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" in her signature cumbia style.

Handsome balladeer, Christian Castro's career has spanned over 20 years with many hit songs to his credit.  Beautifully shot, this dramatic video of "Tu Retirada" (Your withdrawal or leaving) features Castro in Mariachi mode singing with aching longing, tears, and tequlila as he pleads to his lost love - after a bar room brawl:

Bandas from Durango usually use saxophones rather than trumpets and trombones.  In this song/video, the Puro Reyes de Durango start and end their song with a surprisingly jazzy touch not often heard in banda music.  Here they are with "Amarte" (To Love You).

Majestad de la Sierra also hails from Durango and was formed by former band members from K-Paz de la Sierra. They get major points for playing and singing well, wearing cool pink suits, and almost nailing the tricky little side-to-side, head-snapping move called "East Cost-West Coast" in LA Jazz Dance parlance.  OK, I know it's hard to do that with cowboy hats on.  Here they are performing "Dime, Tonto Corazon" (Tell me, foolish heart).

The very popular Banda MS hails from Matzatlan, home of so many great Mexican bandas.  A youthful and energetic band, they seem to specialize in what I call "Cardio Polka" - a very up-tempo style of dance music.  This song "Cahuates, Pistaches" (Peanuts, pistachios) is a tribute to the guy who sells them on the street.  Enjoy Banda MS doing the Funky Chicken, among other things, in very pointy-toed cowboy boots while performing this exuberant song:

Banda Fresa from Guadalajara also excels at the Cardio Polka style of music in many of their songs.  Shot in a idyllic and rustic natural location by a creek where the whole cast gets to wade in the water, this song/video features a bunch of young men admiring a pretty young woman.  So, what else is new?  Here is the very fun Banda Fresa performing "Maria Chuchena" in one of their more serious videos: 

For your continuing musical edification, after referring to "Cardio Polka" twice, I thought it might be a good idea to show you a comparison of some North American polka music, a close cousin of Mexican banda music (see Vol. 1 in the archives for more).  Personally, I really like the Mexican style better - it's simply over-the-top with alegria (exuberant cheerfulness) with a much stronger rhythm.  See for yourself!  Here is a short clip of the Lawrence Welk Band doing the Dakota Polka (I'd love to see how Lawrence Welk would have done any of the above songs if he were still around.):

Topping off this set is Marco Antonio Solis, one of Mexico's most successful singer/songwriters, having sold more than 80 million records to date.  He was once the lead singer of Los Bukis, and went on to a solo career, writing and singing songs that often comment on the wrenching vicissitudes of the human condition.   This song, "A Donde Vamos a Parar?" asks where are we going to stop...hurting each other:

If you enjoyed these songs and videos, please scroll down for links to previous collections including an informative intro, in the archives.

Please see archives for Volume One by clicking here.

Archives for Volume Two by clicking here.

Archives for Volume Three by clicking here.




Copyright 2014, AjijicNews.com

 

Please Visit our Ajijic News Advertisers